Monday, April 24, 2017

What To Do When Machines Do Everything

Malcolm Frank, Paul Roehrig, & Ben Pring, What To Do When Machines Do Everything (Wiley 2017).

"What To Do When Machines Do Everything is a guidebook to succeeding in the next generation of the digital economy. When systems running on Artificial Intelligence can drive our cars, diagnose medical patients, and manage our finances more effectively than humans it raises profound questions on the future of work and how companies compete. Illustrated with real-world cases, data, and insight, the authors provide clear strategic guidance and actionable steps to help you and your organization move ahead in a world where exponentially developing new technologies are changing how value is created."
Publisher's description

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Conceptions in the Code: How Metaphors Explain Legal Challenges in Digital Times

Stefan Larson (Lund University), Conceptions in the Code: How Metaphors Explain Legal Challenges in Digital Times (Oxford Univ. Press 2017).

"Stefan Larsson's Conceptions in the Code makes a significant contribution to sociolegal analysis, representing a valuable contribution to conceptual metaphor theory. By utilising the case of copyright in a digital context it explains the role that metaphor plays when the law is dealing with technological change, displaying both conceptual path-dependence as well as what is called non-legislative developments in the law."
From publisher's description

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Wedlocked: The Perils of Marriage Equality

Katherine Franke (Columbia University), Wedlocked: The Perils of Marriage Equality (N.Y.U. Press 2015).

"Wedlocked turns to history to compare today’s same-sex marriage movement to the experiences of newly emancipated black people in the mid-nineteenth century, when they were able to legally marry for the first time. Maintaining that the transition to greater freedom was both wondrous and perilous for newly emancipated people, Katherine Franke relates stories of former slaves’ involvements with marriage and draws lessons that serve as cautionary tales for today’s marriage rights movements. While 'be careful what you wish for' is a prominent theme, they also teach us how the rights-bearing subject is inevitably shaped by the very rights they bear, often in ways that reinforce racialized gender norms and stereotypes."

Publisher's description

Monday, March 20, 2017

White Trash : The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America

Nancy Isenberg, White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America (Penguin Books 2017).

"Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over four hundred years, Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society–where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility . . . Marginalized as a class, white trash have always been at or near the center of major political debates over the character of the American identity."
Publisher's description