Thursday, September 22, 2016

From Maimonides to Microsoft: The Jewish Law of Copyright since the Birth of Print

Neil Weinstock Netanel (UCLA), From Maimonides to Microsoft: The Jewish Law of Copyright since the Birth of Print (Oxford Univ. Press 2016).

"In From Maimonides to Microsoft, Professor Netanel traces the historical development of Jewish copyright law by comparing rabbinic reprinting bans with secular and papal book privileges and by relaying the stories of dramatic disputes among publishers of books of Jewish learning and liturgy. He describes each dispute in its historical context and examines the rabbinic rulings that sought to resolve it. Remarkably, the rabbinic reprinting bans and copyright rulings address some of the same issues that animate copyright jurisprudence today: Is copyright a property right or just a right to receive fair compensation? How long should copyrights last? What purposes does copyright serve? While Jewish copyright law has borrowed from its secular law counterpart at key junctures, it fashions strikingly different answers to those key questions."
Publisher's description

Monday, September 12, 2016

Hate Speech and Democratic Citizenship

Eric Heinze (University of London), Hate Speech and Democratic Citizenship (Oxford Univ. Press, 2016). 


"Most modern democracies punish hate speech. Less freedom for some, they claim, guarantees greater freedom for others. Heinze rejects that approach, arguing that democracies have better ways of combating violence and discrimination against vulnerable groups without having to censor speakers. Critiquing dominant free speech theories, Heinze explains that free expression must be safeguarded not just as an individual right, but as an essential attribute of democratic citizenship. The book challenges contemporary state regulation of public discourse by promoting a stronger theory of what democracy is and what it demands. Examining US, European and international approaches, Heinze offers a new vision of free speech within Western democracies." 

Publisher's description

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Jackson, 1964

Calvin Trillin, Jackson, 1964 (Penguin Random House, 2016).

"From bestselling author and beloved New Yorker writer Calvin Trillin, a deeply resonant, career-spanning collection of articles on race and racism, from the 1960s to the present.

In the early sixties, Calvin Trillin got his start as a journalist covering the Civil Rights Movement in the South. Over the next five decades of reporting, he often returned to scenes of racial tension. Now, for the first time, the best of Trillin’s pieces on race in America have been collected in one volume."


 Publisher's description

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

The Human Rights of Migrants and Refugees in European Law

Cathryn Costello (Oxford), The Human Rights of Migrants and Refugees in European Law (Oxford Univ. Press 2016).

"Focusing on access to territory and authorization of presence and residence for third-country nationals, this book examines the EU law on immigration and asylum, addressing related questions of security of residence. Concentrating on the key measures concerning both the rights of third-country nationals to enter and stay in the EU, and the EU's construction of illegal immigration, it provides a detailed and critical discussion of EU and ECHR migration and refugee law."

Publisher's description


Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet

Jeffrey Rosen (George Washington University Law School), Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet (Yale Univ. Press 2016).

"According to Jeffrey Rosen, Louis D. Brandeis was 'the Jewish Jefferson,' the greatest critic of what he called 'the curse of bigness,' in business and government, since the author of the Declaration of Independence. Published to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of his Supreme Court confirmation on June 1, 1916, Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet argues that Brandeis was the most farseeing constitutional philosopher of the twentieth century. In addition to writing the most famous article on the right to privacy, he also wrote the most important Supreme Court opinions about free speech, freedom from government surveillance, and freedom of thought and opinion. And as the leader of the American Zionist movement, he convinced Woodrow Wilson and the British government to recognize a Jewish homeland in Palestine. Combining narrative biography with a passionate argument for why Brandeis matters today, Rosen explores what Brandeis, the Jeffersonian prophet, can teach us about historic and contemporary questions involving the Constitution, monopoly, corporate and federal power, technology, privacy, free speech, and Zionism."


Publisher's Description