Tuesday, November 25, 2014

The International Law of Human Trafficking

Anne T. Gallagher, The International Law of Human Trafficking (Cambridge University Press, 2012).

"Although human trafficking has a long and ignoble history, it is only recently that trafficking has become a major political issue for states and the international community and the subject of detailed international rules. This book presents the first-ever comprehensive and in-depth analysis of the international law of human trafficking. Anne T. Gallagher calls on her direct experience working within the United Nations to chart the development of new international laws on this issue. She links these rules to the international law of state responsibility as well as key norms of international human rights law, transnational criminal law, refugee law, and international criminal law, in the process identifying and explaining the major legal obligations of states with respect to preventing trafficking, protecting and supporting victims, and prosecuting perpetrators."

Publisher's website


Monday, November 17, 2014

Law and Development of Middle-Income Countries: Avoiding the Middle-Income Trap

Randall Peerenboom (La Trobe University) & Tom Ginsburg (University of Chicago) (eds.). Law and Development of Middle-Income Countries: Avoiding the Middle-Income Trap (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

"In 1960, there were 101 middle-income countries. By 2008, only thirteen of these had become high-income countries. Why do so many middle-income countries fail to develop after a promising start, becoming mired in the so-called middle-income trap? This interdisciplinary volume addresses the special challenges that middle-income countries confront from both a theoretical and a practical perspective. It is the first volume that addresses law and development issues in middle-income countries from the perspective of political, administrative, and legal institutions and policies." 
Publisher's website

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Perfecting Pregnancy: Law, Disability, and the Future of Reproduction

Isabel Karpin & Kristin Savell (University of Sydney), Perfecting Pregnancy: Law, Disability, and the Future of Reproduction (University of Cambridge Press, 2014).

"Prenatal and preimplantation testing technologies have offered unprecedented access to information about the genetic and congenital makeup of our prospective progeny. Future developments such as preconception testing, noninvasive prenatal testing, and more extensive preimplantation testing promise to increase that access further still. . . . The overwhelming question for legislators has been whether and, if so, how to regulate the use of these technologies in the face of compelling but seemingly contradictory claims about the advancement of reproductive choice and the dangers of eugenic or discriminatory effects."
                                                               —Publisher's website

Monday, November 10, 2014

Seeking Human Rights Justice in Latin America: Truth, Extra-Territorial Courts, and the Process of Justice

Jeffrey Davis (University of Maryland), Seeking Human Rights Justice in Latin America (Cambridge University Press, 2013).

"This book studies how victims of human rights violations in Latin America, their families, and their advocates work to overcome entrenched impunity and seek legal justice. Their struggles show that legal justice is a multifaceted process, the overarching purpose of which is to restore human dignity and prevent further violence. Uncovering, revealing, and proving the truth are essential elements of legal justice, and are also powerful tools to activate the process. When faced with stubborn impunity at home, victims, families, and advocates can carry on their work for legal justice by bringing cases in courts in other countries or in the Inter-American human rights system. These extra-territorial courts can jumpstart the process of legal justice at home."

Publisher's website


Thursday, November 6, 2014

What Stays in Vegas: The World of Personal Data—Lifeblood of Big Business—and the End of Privacy as We Know It

Adam Tanner (Harvard University). What Stays in Vegas: The World of Personal Data—Lifeblood of Big Business—and the End of Privacy as We Know It (PublicAffairs, 2014).

"Caesars’ dogged data-gathering methods have been so successful that they have grown to become the world’s largest casino operator, and have inspired companies of all kinds to ramp up their own data mining in the hopes of boosting their targeted marketing efforts. Some do this themselves. Some rely on data brokers. Others clearly enter a moral gray zone that should make American consumers deeply uncomfortable. . . . We live in an age when our personal information is harvested and aggregated whether we like it or not. And it is growing ever more difficult for those businesses that choose not to engage in more intrusive data gathering to compete with those that do."
—Publisher's Website